Where Should Video Be Placed On My Website?

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You’ve decided to hire a crew to make your professional video. Your web development company has insisted you have it. They have some ideas of where and what they want, but you want to know, “Where should my video live on my website to get the greatest impact?”

When you create a professional video for your website, you want to think about where you are going to place it. Whether it will be hosted on YouTube, Vimeo, or your own site, knowing what to do with it is key. To answer the question of where to place it, we have a few questions we’d ask in return. First, what type of video are you creating? (If you’re not sure what type of video you should have, see the blog post titled What Type of Video Should My Business Have in 2018?) Next, why did you decide this is the video you wanted to create? You might have a little motivation as to why you’ve create this video, so help us understand that. Once we understand what video and why, we can help you better decide where to place it on your site. Here are a few options in terms of where to place your video(s) on your website:

  • Home Page (Above the Fold). This might be a good place for video that doesn’t have music or speaking parts. Here’s an example of a website that uses video in the background above the fold.  The Yacht Company does a great job showing off yachts before you travel through the rest of the site. This is a simple video you should ask for when shooting video. You never know when your site might lend itself to a snippet like this.
  • Home Page (Below the Fold). The types of videos that you use here are usually the About Us style videos. A recent client, HyDroneClean, created a short informational video about what they do and placed it on their home page (scroll down a little). When a potential client lands on a website, they tend to scroll a little bit anyway to see if they can learn more. Once they see a video, the play button beckons them to push it!
  • About Us Page. Again, this is where you might find the About Us video. It features a story about the business and allows the viewer to better understand how they might benefit from working with the business.
  • Testimonials Page. So many times businesses have written testimonials listed on their site, and that’s awesome. If you’re looking to kick up the value of the testimonials, a video testimonial is even better. Check out Credit Brain’s testimonials that we shot for them a while back. They have a dedicated web page on their site to feature these videos, telling us, a video is even more valuable than just the written words.
  • Blog. Does your site have a blog? Has it been helpful to create content for Search Engine Optimization (SEO) results? That’s the number one way you can create great SEO results is to constantly create content. If you want to “level up” your blogging game, add video. There are several ways to do it. One option is to create videos based on what you wrote or write the blog based on what you say in the video. Another option is to feature a written blog about one topic linked to a video blog you created on YouTube. A great example of this is our video blogging site MyVideo101.com. This site is based on the YouTube Channel created by our very own Jennifer Jager. She blogs about all aspects of video and the blog is created based on what she shares on her YouTube Channel. Check it out.

These are just a few uses of a video. Where you place them is based on it’s purpose and expected outcome. If you expect people to call you after viewing the video, the best types of video are the Testimonial and About Us videos. If you want people to better understand what you do in a short amount of time, an About Us video is your best bet. Finally, when you have a need for improved SEO, consider a video blog (with a written portion to ensure all the search engines find you).

How To Use Video to Recruit Talent (Talent Acquisition)

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We’ve had several clients use video to acquire new talent. When hiring, you want the best of the best, right? Part of finding the best is being found. Whether you use a job board, a head hunter, or just market jobs on your website, we’re pretty sure you want to convey a message of professionalism and refinement. You have some options here and one of the ways you can differentiate your business (and the jobs you are posting) is video.

Most of our clients like to stand apart from their competition by being a little different. Most companies are not using video to their fullest capacity, meaning, they are not using all the tools at their disposal. Again, it depends on your industry and your needs, but when placing a post for a job, there comes a time when video will capture attention and increase visibility.

We have several recommendations when it comes to creating an effective video, and they apply to employment videos as well.

  • Be Up Front. This doesn’t mean, don’t lie…it means, say what’s important early on so people know what you’re talking about and why they should continue to listen. This applies to the employment video too. What’s the job? Who should apply? Who shouldn’t apply? What are the absolute must haves to getting the job? When does it start (if important)? Pick any one or two of these to be in the very beginning of the video. By doing this, you’re telling the viewer who the right audience is and if they don’t fit the mold, they can continue in their search for the right job for them.
  • Be concise. No one wants to listen to a 10 minute diatribe about a job. What they do want to know are answers to their burning questions. Give those answers as quickly and concisely as possible.
  • Keep it Short. Along with concise goes short, so this should go without saying; however, we also know that when you work closely with a project, you might forget about the end user or client. Keep the length appropriate for the purpose. Keep in mind, sometimes it makes sense to go longer, sometimes it doesn’t, but don’t go long to get it all in. Leave the wanting more.

Once you have the concept, you’ll also want to consider where to place the video(s). We’ve seen a couple of avenues that make sense. One of our clients, a Fort Lauderdale company used their videos on their website to make active when the job was open (or about to open) and disabled (hidden) when the job was occupied and the listing was not needed. Another client, a Boca Raton company, placed the video on LinkedIn to bring in prospects. They were hiring for similar roles all the time and placed the video on their company page and in their feed on occasion to bring awareness to their need. We also had a West Palm Beach company place their video into hiring groups on social media and on their listing (as a link) in their online hiring job board (think Ladders, Monster, etc.). They tell us they were able to tell prospective new hires exactly what they wanted to attract the right people. Of course, they still had to do all the necessary work to hire someone like interviewing and background checks, but they felt it was worth the pre-work and effort to attract the right people.

Here’s an example of one of those videos:


If you have any questions or want to find out more information about video and how it may help you, let us know. We’re here to help!

Do We Have to be on Camera? Why People are the MOST Important Part!

Human brains are hardwired to recognize faces. When a video has a person talking in it, customers are more likely to connect with the video. When the audience can see the human behind the voice, they are more likely to trust what you are telling them. Speech is perceived by more than just auditory cues, we take in visual ones as well.

As a species, we are hardwired to be judgmental. Many people do not trust the information they read online. A study done in 2009 found that rather than trusting the people with the most expertise in a subject, people are more likely to trust those they believe have their best interests at heart. Psychologists at Princeton discovered that in only a tenth of a second, we form impressions of strangers from their faces alone, and our brain then responds based on how trustworthy we find their face to be.

In video, it is important to note that just having a trust worthy looking person is not going to make your audience listen to the message presented in your video. Remember, speech perception relies on both visual and auditory cues. The combination of both a great speech and a trustworthy face, among other things, is what will make your video the most compelling.

So, how can you get people to want to listen to your video? There are a few items that are critical to building the trust you deserve. First, you must be authentic. Be you. Don’t try to be someone you are not. If you look, sound, or feel uncomfortable, it will show, and many viewers will see, hear, and feel it. Second, demonstrate your integrity by showing us how much you believe in what you are saying. Again, if you come across as fake or phony, it will show. A good analogy is a dog’s behavior when certain people walk into the room. Some people are deathly afraid of dogs and the dog can sense it immediately. We humans have learned to do something similar…to sniff out false and bogus people. Some are better at it than others are, but we all have this ability. Third, people don’t care how much you know, they want to know how much you care. If you are genuine in caring about your viewer, they will sense it and feel a higher level of comfort in listening to you speak. Finally, speak the truth. Don’t sugarcoat or exaggerate…these all come across counter to the previous three and will completely destroy your credibility.

This can be applied to all parts of speaking, but with video, you need to be aware of more than just your speech. Your background shouldn’t distract from your message. You are what they should be paying attention to, not the bookshelf of what’s happening outside the window behind you. Add text to the screen to help reinforce what you are saying. It also focuses the viewer on what you are saying and subtly tells them, “This is important!” Have confidence and be positive while on camera and use transitions when speaking. It helps the viewer follow along when you say things like, “Now that I’ve covered XYZ, let’s move on to ABC.” This transition tells the viewer where you are and what to expect next. Sound like English class all over again? Good! It should.

Having just a trustworthy face is not enough to make people want to listen to your video; however, neither is just having a good speech. If you take the time to focus on all aspects of your video, including what’s in the background, what you’re wearing, and even the music that is playing, your video will have a much better chance of being listened to and acted upon. You want to connect to your audience, so give them what they need. Comfort, trust, integrity.

As always, we coach clients how to perform better on camera during our shoots. When we have someone who is struggling on camera, we do our best to help him or her relax and speak clearly. After all, you know the subject matter, just talk as if you’re talking to a friend. We’ll do the rest! Let us know when you’re ready to get started.

 

Source: Wistia Blog. (2017). Why Videos Featuring Humans are Easier to Trust. Retrieved from: https://wistia.com/blog/make-trustworthy-videos-with-humans on September 28, 2017.