Steps to Video Production

Here’s a step by step list of how the video production process works and why you shouldn’t be afraid of it. Many people think that corporate video production is a big, scary process the requires a lot of people and a lot of resources. It might, but it doesn’t always need to be that complicated. Most potential clients we speak to are a little apprehensive about shooting video…they have a lot of questions, like: How long does it take? Who should be on camera? How much does it cost? But most of all, they want to know what it takes to get their video.

Steps to Video Production

To make it simple, we’ve boiled down the most important steps to creating your video into simple bite sized pieces. Ready? Here they are:

Pre-Production

1. Goals

First, before you begin, you have to have some objective. To do video without a goal or objective, you’re doing yourself a disservice. What are you trying to accomplish, in what amount of time? Is this realistically possible? If you’re not sure where to start, we can help, but most clients want to measure views, calls, or purchases when they create video. Whichever your goal, share that with your video production company and use that in the next step.

2. Know The Audience

Who are you trying to reach and why are you trying to reach them? Your video should be engaging to the exact audience you’re trying to reach, so knowing who they are is a critical start. Do your research and identify your target audience, their needs, wants and desires. Know what they like and how they like to get it. This will help you craft your message in precisely the way they like to receive it. You might want to consider creating a target audience persona (or personas). By creating personas, you’ll know how to speak to them in their preferred method of communication. If your product or service solves a problem they face, make sure your message reflects that and speaks directly to the issues they face.

3. Create a Script

Whether you write the script or the video production company writes the script, make sure you have a solid, well-thought out script that will make the shoot easier. When we talk about script, we’re not just talking about the words being spoken on camera, but also the visuals…what will be seen on screen…a shot list of sorts. By spelling out what is being said and what is being shown, your video crew will know what they must capture to create the perfect video for you. Again, this should also incorporate the first two steps above (knowing your audience and what goals you’re measuring). Remember, the script should be engaging and/or thought provoking so the viewer will take action once they’ve finished watching.

4. Have a Placement Strategy

Plan ahead of the shoot by knowing where you’ll be placing the video(s). If you’re just placing them on YouTube, how will you get them to be suggested or referred or shared? People won’t just do it because you’ve put it out there, you need a bit of a plan. That might include using ads, setting up the YouTube channel properly, publishing consistently, and several other things. Have your plan no matter which platform you’ll use.

5. Develop the Idea Further

Once you’ve crafted the script and started planning placement, you might need to develop the concept/script a little further. If you’ve identified one platform that will outperform over the others, does the script you created make sense or does it need some fine-tuning? It might or it might not. This is the time to revise and solidify.

6. Plan and Schedule the Shoot

During this step, several “mini” steps must happen. Your production crew should scout the location (virtually or in person). By scouting the location, they will mentally be able to identify where various shots will be set up, how they’ll set it up, and where they can stage their equipment while shooting or where hair and makeup can be set up.

Also in this step might be casting talent. If you’re using talent in your video, you’ll want options to choose from, and this is where we provide them. You’ll want to select the individual who best represents your brand.

Are permits or licenses necessary? If they are, this is when you’ll submit and get approvals. Allow sufficient time to get these if the production is larger or if you need to work with multiple agencies or locations.

Backup plans are critical at this point. When planning for a shoot, ask the production company what things can go wrong and how to have a backup plan to mitigate those issues.

Finally, the production company should be creating and delivering a call sheet. The call sheet will inform all parties (crew, client, staff, location, etc.) when everything will be happening. It’s basically a schedule for the day(s) with all the information need to communicate and know who will be where and when.

Production

7. Shoot/Capture the Raw Video

If you’re creating a corporate video, you’ll want someone on-set to ensure all the important pieces are captured and that everything is visually on brand. That person (or persons) may also need to wrangle the next person on camera so they’re prepared and in place on time and on schedule. During this part of the production you’ll notice the crew following the plan. You’ll notice when the crew is ahead or behind schedule and you’ll know if things are going perfect or if there’s an adjustment that will need to be made. Sometimes one person who can’t get the words out on camera can put the crew a little behind, but a seasoned crew will make sure that even when that happens they stay on schedule and on plan. If the crew is seasoned you should have a high level of confidence in their abilities once you see them execute the plan.

Post Production

8. Editing

Once the shoot is complete, you should have a rough idea from the crew when the first version of your video will be delivered. If you have a seasoned editor, most corporate videos require between a week to two weeks to see your first version. Variability in this may happen if the video is longer than a couple of minutes or branding materials aren’t delivered quickly to the production team (editor). The editor will need high-resolution logos and other similar materials related to the video (something they may have asked for prior to the shoot).

Good editing will be based on good planning…which is why we recommend the plan be finalized before shooting every time…no matter how many times you’ve done this. While every video production company is different, most will allow around two rounds of revision after receiving your first version. If you’re editing more than one video, a good editor will also recommend providing you with one of the videos first to get any revisions you might have and then apply all those revisions to the rest of the videos to streamline the editing process for you and for them. For example, if you didn’t like the color of the font they used and you provide that feedback, the rest of the videos you’ll receive will already contain those revisions…saving you time.

Your editor will also incorporate 2D graphics, 3D Animation, music, and any professional narration at this point. Graphics and animation should make sense for the video. Adding them to wow you isn’t working with your strategy we started with, so it should make sense if the graphics or animation is added.

Music should also reflect the mood and tone of the video. If the music is upbeat, but the person on camera is talking about the problems the viewer is facing, something will feel wrong by the viewer… making it less likely they will take the next measurable step (think about your goals).

It is also at this point that any professional narration that was recorded is tracked to the video. Typically a good editor will time verbal statements with music, changes in mood, and visual elements to make the finished piece emotionally connected.

9. Delivery

Once you’ve provided all the feedback and it’s been edited to your satisfaction, you should receive a download link from the production company so you can place your video where you would like to place it. You might place it on: your website, YouTube channel, social media sites, Vimeo, Wistia, or a few other places that will help you monitor and analyze your results. You’ll want to make sure you place it in a place that allows you to fully control, own, and monitor all the analytics. Without that, you won’t know if you’re successful or not.

10. Distribute Your Video

Not everyone distributes video the same way, so we’ll provide a few options here, but know there are always more. You might: use social media, email campaigns, coordinate with influencers in your space, use a PR firm to distribute your video, use the video in online video ads, place the video on broadcast television or cable, or use SEO tactics on your website to funnel viewers to a landing page to watch the video. One isn’t necessarily better than the other but understanding your strategy and knowing your goals will help you decide where to distribute/place your video.

We hope this helps you better understand the steps it takes to create a corporate video and why each step is important to the overall project. The next thing you might want to do is consider reading 6 Qualities To Look For In A Video Production Company or Why Do Production Companies Quote Different Rates for the Same Project?

5 Ways to Use Video to Market Your Business

We hear it all the time. “I know I need to create video to help us online, but what do I create?” While it may be difficult for some to come up with ideas, we’ve seen hundreds of ideas. So if you’re having a tough time, give us a call and we can help you come up with a few. More importantly, what type of video content will provide the best return on your time and investment?

Let’s begin with how your customers research and make buying decisions. Most of the time customer acquisition and customer buying habits are similar. Customers start out not knowing who you are or if you’d be someone they should call or visit. If they become aware of you, they may become aware of how you might be able to solve their problem or improve their life somehow. Then, they start to do some research. They find other companies who can do the same type of work and decide on the one, two, three or more to contact to get an idea of who might be the best fit for them. Once they’ve done all the research, they pick up the phone and make the call. Once they’re a customer, you begin the trek of retaining them by keeping them happy.

We think there’s more to video than just creating it. We believe there has to be a long- and short-term plan to creating and using your video. One of the most important factors is knowing how you’ll measure success and whether it is worth the investment. Sometimes, in our meetings, we tell our prospective clients that creating a video isn’t worth the investment based on what they need, how they are measuring success, and how they’ll implement the strategy. If we find it is worth the time and effort, we talk about how it will be used. Knowing how it will be used is critical to the success of a video. Let’s dig into the types of video and how it can be used.

Educational Blog-Style Video Content

Educational Videos or Topical Videos are simply short videos that answer a specific question someone might want to know the answer to. We typically see this type of content with professional service businesses. Think financial planners, attorneys, estate planners, fitness trainers, etc. If there’s education to be sought by your prospective client/customer, this is the type of video you should consider pursuing. The other thing to consider when creating this type of video is what is the problem you’re trying to solve? For example, if you’re a financial planning firm and people want to know answers to questions regarding their money, if they find you to be highly knowledgeable and trustworthy, they’re more likely to make the call. So educational content is typically used for those who want to convey a high level of trust and illustrate a depth of knowledge.


Explainer Videos (Live Action &/or Animated)

Explainer videos are just that…they explain what a product or service is and helps the buyer understand how they should use it. These can also be referred to as a demonstration video. If you’re trying to connect with the viewer (on a more personal level), you might consider using a live action video. For example, in the video below, this product explainer video helps the viewer understand the problem it solves, how to set it up, and who might purchase it. This is the type of video you might need if you were trying to help someone make a decision. They’ve landed on your page or they’ve spoken to you already, have enough information to be informed and now they want to understand a few more details. These types of videos typically live on a website homepage (landing page) or YouTube or anywhere someone might discover your product/service by searching for it (don’t forget about Amazon).


Location Tour Video

Sometimes your space is so beautiful and captivating, it becomes important to show it off in a video. For example, in this dental practice, it’s one thing to say, “I’m great with kids!” but it’s whole other level to show how cool your space is and how cool you can be with the kids. That’s what this dentist in Port Saint Lucie did with this video. Notice how he shows off the space talks about how much kids love it? Notice how the kids are having a great time while visiting the dentist? What you don’t know is that they sometimes have a hard time getting the kids to leave after they’ve had their checkup! What a problem to have, right?


Video Reviews (or Testimonials or Customer Story Videos)

In most cases, when a customer is happy they don’t always tell everyone, but they should. Why would they want to hide great service? Well, it’s just not as easy as that. You have to ask them. Ask your best customers, your best advocates, to tell their story about how you helped them. They will most likely be happy to do it. Take this example of how one company helped Bill reduce his debts by negotiating with the debt collection company on his behalf. By listening to his story, one can understand how stressful it must have been to live through the experience before they negotiated on his behalf. Video reviews should be used when the prospective buyer is about to buy, meaning, one of the last steps of the buying process. This might mean after a website visit you could follow up with one of these videos or on the testimonial section your website.


Commercial Video

Commercial videos hammer home the point, “You should buy this.” It’s direct advertising and typically pushes the viewer to take some form of action. This can be done directly, softly, or through stories, but are highly effective. This type of video is typically shorter in nature and appeal to as wide of an audience as possible. This is a video that should push a viewer into your sales funnel. It is critical to target your audience as directly as possible while using this type of video because if it shows up in front of the wrong audience, you’ll have a zero return on the investment of time or dollars. Speaking the language of the viewer becomes critical as well. The example here is the Tater Gator. This was used on end caps and websites where the product was sold to help the viewer understand what the product does and how to use it.

When you’re choosing which video to create, remember to think about why you’re doing it. If you are doing it to get your name out there, we highly recommend you stop what you’re doing and ask yourself how you’ll measure it’s success. If you are not sure how to do that, ask us. We’ll be happy to share with you a few of our tips to know whether it’s worth your time, money, and energy to take on a video project. Sometimes doing what you’ve been doing is just fine…and sometimes it’s time to elevate your game. Have more questions? Give us a call and we’ll be happy to answer any questions you have!

SOURCE: Demo Duck. https://demoduck.com/video-for-business/

Where Should Video Be Placed On My Website?

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You’ve decided to hire a crew to make your professional video. Your web development company has insisted you have it. They have some ideas of where and what they want, but you want to know, “Where should my video live on my website to get the greatest impact?”

When you create a professional video for your website, you want to think about where you are going to place it. Whether it will be hosted on YouTube, Vimeo, or your own site, knowing what to do with it is key. To answer the question of where to place it, we have a few questions we’d ask in return. First, what type of video are you creating? (If you’re not sure what type of video you should have, see the blog post titled What Type of Video Should My Business Have in 2018?) Next, why did you decide this is the video you wanted to create? You might have a little motivation as to why you’ve create this video, so help us understand that. Once we understand what video and why, we can help you better decide where to place it on your site. Here are a few options in terms of where to place your video(s) on your website:

  • Home Page (Above the Fold). This might be a good place for video that doesn’t have music or speaking parts. Here’s an example of a website that uses video in the background above the fold. The Yacht Company does a great job showing off yachts before you travel through the rest of the site. This is a simple video you should ask for when shooting video. You never know when your site might lend itself to a snippet like this.
  • Home Page (Below the Fold). The types of videos that you use here are usually the About Us style videos. A recent client, HyDroneClean, created a short informational video about what they do and placed it on their home page (scroll down a little). When a potential client lands on a website, they tend to scroll a little bit anyway to see if they can learn more. Once they see a video, the play button beckons them to push it!
  • About Us Page. Again, this is where you might find the About Us video. It features a story about the business and allows the viewer to better understand how they might benefit from working with the business.
  • Testimonials Page. So many times businesses have written testimonials listed on their site, and that’s awesome. If you’re looking to kick up the value of the testimonials, a video testimonial is even better. Check out Credit Brain’s testimonials that we shot for them a while back. They have a dedicated web page on their site to feature these videos, telling us, a video is even more valuable than just the written words.
  • Blog. Does your site have a blog? Has it been helpful to create content for Search Engine Optimization (SEO) results? That’s the number one way you can create great SEO results is to constantly create content. If you want to “level up” your blogging game, add video. There are several ways to do it. One option is to create videos based on what you wrote or write the blog based on what you say in the video. Another option is to feature a written blog about one topic linked to a video blog you created on YouTube. A great example of this is our video blogging site MyVideo101.com. This site is based on the YouTube Channel created by our very own Jennifer Jager. She blogs about all aspects of video and the blog is created based on what she shares on her YouTube Channel. Check it out.

These are just a few uses of a video. Where you place them is based on it’s purpose and expected outcome. If you expect people to call you after viewing the video, the best types of video are the Testimonial and About Us videos. If you want people to better understand what you do in a short amount of time, an About Us video is your best bet. Finally, when you have a need for improved SEO, consider a video blog (with a written portion to ensure all the search engines find you).